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New Fish Disease
by Francois Pretorius
06 March 2012
MORE ARTICLES

Just received this from Cape Nature.....

Please spread Dr Weyl’s article to all relevant angling magazines and web-sites so that we can inform and educate the anglers about this serious new fish disease. Anglers can help report suspicious looking infected fish to Dr Kevin Christison, a fish parasitologist at the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries in Cape Town, who first diagnosed the disease in South Africa.

His contact details are: KevinCH@nda.agric.za

It is also a call to anglers NOT to move fish from one water body to another without permit. One is not just moving the fish, the parasites on the fish go too.

Epizootic Ulceritic Syndrome Now in South Africa Olaf Weyl (South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity) The fish disease, Epizootic Ulceritic Syndrome or EUS for short, was recently diagnosed by researchers from the Aquaculture Research Division of the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, in barbel from a farm dam near Stellenbosch.

The disease is caused by a fungus that is originally from Southeast Asia but has been spread to many other parts of the world by the movement of live fish and, possibly by the transport of contaminated water. While confirmed diagnosis requires histological examination of the tissue and genetic screening for the presence of the fungus, I have recently received an alarming number of reports of fish with ulcers from all over Southern Africa.

Waters where suspect fish have been reported include Theewaterskloof Dam, Buffelsjagts and Arabie Dam in the Western Cape and more recently in Hartebeespoort and the Vaal Dam in Gauteng. I have also received photos of bass from Zimbabwe that appear to have similar ulcers and EUS has been present in the Upper Zambezi and the Okavango Rivers for a couple of years. Once introduced, the disease is fairly indiscriminate and has been reported to affect most fish species including popular angling species such as bass, barbel, carp, nembwe and tigerfish. Infection of fish requires the breaking of the skin for the fungus to get hold and once infected, the disease manifests itself in three stages. The disease progressed as follows: first, pinhead sized red spots form on the body and fins of the fish; these develop into small (2-4 cm) ulcers which finally form large open ulcers which eventually kill the fish.

The distribution of the disease in South Africa is currently unknown and we unfortunately do not know what its long term impact will on our native fish stocks. What we do know is that disease spreads aggressively through fish populations once introduced. Unfortunately, there appears to be no feasible way to control this disease once it affects wild fish populations and the only control measure is to try to limit its spread in the country.

It is therefore vital that all anglers understand that: THE ONLY WAY TO CONTROL THIS DISEASE IS TO CONTROL ITS SPREAD TO NEW WATERS. We can all contribute to this by the following: • Do not move any fish, live bait or fish parts from one water body to another. Fish with no clinical signs may be carriers of the disease. • Do not keep infected fish in your livewell is may result in the fungus being transmitted to healthy fish. • Use knotless landing nets to minimize abrasions on the fish. • Empty your live-well and bilges before leaving the launch site. • Clean boats, trailers, fishing gear and drain live wells and bait buckets between fishing trips. If you have been outside South Africa, consider taking the extra precaution of soaking your live-well and bilge area with a solution of one 1 tablespoon of bleach (Jik or Jayes Fluid) to 5 liters of water for 10 minutes. Then rinse thoroughly to get rid of any remaining bleach (watch your carpets!).

• Help educate other anglers in the dangers of disease transmission.
• Please send photos of suspicious fish and GPS coordinates to me as I would like to monitor this situation. Please send photos of suspicious fish and GPS coordinates to Olaf Weyl at o.weyl@saiab.ac.za



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